Today's Workplace

What should you know about today's workplace? These articles and reports will provide you with some insight into today's workplace.


Job Market for College Class of 2006 Best in Four Years
The college Class of 2006 will enjoy the best job market in four years, according to a report published by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

Employers expect to hire 14.5 percent more new college graduates in 2005-2006 than they hired in 2004-05, according to NACE's Job Outlook 2006 report.

Read more:
http://www.naceweb.org/press/display.asp?year=2005&prid=226


Most Lucrative College Degrees
In survey of the Class of 2006, engineers still get top salary offers, but accounting and finance majors are climbing quickly.

If the offers that are already starting to roll in are any indicator, the class of 2006 will probably be thinking more about their first paycheck than their freshly minted diploma by the time graduation arrives.

Read more:
http://money.cnn.com/2006/02/13/pf/college/starting_salaries/index.htm


A Phony Science Gap?

It's true that in a "knowledge economy" -- one where new information and ideas increasingly form the basis of useful products and government programs -- nations need an adequate science and engineering (S&E) workforce. But it's emphatically not true, as much of the alarmist commentary on America's "competitiveness" implies, that the United States now faces crippling shortages in its technological elites.

Read more:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/21/AR2006022101166.html


Poll: College Students Prefer Smaller Employers

A recent poll reveals that small and medium-sized companies have an edge over large companies when it comes to recruiting new college graduates. When asked "What size company would you most like to work for?", 70 percent of respondents chose "A small or medium size company" while just 30 percent chose "A large international company." The poll was conducted among nearly 500 recent graduates by CollegeGrad.com.

Read more:
http://hr.blr.com/display.cfm/id/17867


Underemployment Affects 18 Percent of Entry Level Job Seekers
"I’ve got a job, but I’m looking for something better..." 18 percent of recent college grad job seekers are underemployed, according to a recent survey of college graduates by the #1 entry level job site, CollegeGrad.com. "The last four years of slow economic growth has caused many students to take any job after graduation, even if it didn’t meet their expectations," said Brian Krueger, President of CollegeGrad.com. “The net result is that there are a large number of underemployed entry level job seekers still looking for their first entry level job in their field of study.”

Read more:
http://www.collegegrad.com/press/underemployed.shtml

Diversity Issues in the Workplace
The Wall Street Journal has interested articles that focus on diversity issues in the workplace.

Read more:
http://www.careerjournal.com/myc/diversity/


The Real World: What Entry-level Workers Wish They'd Known When They Graduated

For many college students, taking the headlong plunge outside the safe, secure world of college results in a rude awakening to some of the cold, cruel realities of the real-world rat race. We talked to some recent graduates of Stetson University, DeLand, FL, to see what they wish they had known about the real world when they graduated and what advice they would impart to those about to leave the college womb.

Read more:
http://www.quintcareers.com/Real_World.html


Future of Work Report
What are the major factors that will shape the future of work in the current century and how are those factors likely to evolve over the next 10 to 15 years? What are the implications of these future trends for key aspects of the future workforce and workplace, including the size, composition, and skills of the workforce; the nature of work and workplace arrangements; and worker compensation?

Read more:
http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/2004/RAND_MG164.pdf
(PDF File)


Writing Skills Necessary for Employment, Says Big Business
Poorly written job applications are a figurative kiss of death, and corporations spend several billion dollars annually improving writing among employees, according to a business survey released here today by a blue-ribbon group worried about the quality of writing in the nation's schools and colleges.

Read more:
http://www.writingcommission.org/pr/writing_for_employ.html


Welcome to America's Career InfoNet!
Smart career decisions start here! Find wages and employment trends, occupational requirements, state by state labor market conditions, millions of employer contacts nationwide, and the most extensive career resource library online.

Read more:
http://www.acinet.org/acinet/


U.S. Dept. of Labor - Bureau of Labor Statistics
The Office of Occupational Statistics and Employment Projections develops information about the labor market for the Nation as a whole for 10 years in the future.

Read more:
http://www.bls.gov/emp/home.htm

 

 

 

 

 
courtesy of Saint Michael's College
   

 

 
© 2006 Ventures In Education, Inc.