Interviewing

This section provides you with links to:


INFORMATIONAL INTERVIEWING

Informational Interview
The informational interview involves spending roughly 30 minutes with a professional in an area in which you have an interest, and "picking their brain", asking them precise questions about their daily tasks and job responsibilities. If you discover your own interests and skills match these, then you are that much closer to choosing your major and career direction.

Read more:
http://www.wpi.edu/Admin/CDC/Students/Forms/interviews.html


Informational Interviewing
As you begin to increase your self-awareness, you will also need to examine the world of work in greater detail. A great way to learn about an industry or a career is to speak with someone who is currently working in that industry or career. An informational interview is a conversation or informal interview to gather information and seek advice from a knowledgeable individual. It is important to understand that the purpose of an informational interview is NOT to ask for a job or internship.

Read more:
http://www.vanderbilt.edu/career/informationalinterviewing.pdf  
(PDF File)


Information Interviewing
This link provides a list of questions to ask when you are trying to learn about the company.

Read more:
http://www.sc.edu/career/pdf/infointerview.pdf   (PDF File)


INTERVIEWING

Interviewing for Internships

Interviewing for an internship or co-op assignment does not have to be a scary process! Think of it as conversation between you and an internship representative to see if there is a fit between your goals and the internship position. You are interviewing her, just as she is interviewing you. You want to know if this internship will allow you to meet your learning goals. She is trying to find out if you have what it takes to help the organization meet its needs. Doing your homework prior to your interview is the key to a successful interview ‘conversation.' Taking time to lay the groundwork increases the odds that your meeting will be productive

Read more:
http://www.jobweb.com/resources/library/InternCoop_Programs/Interviewing_for_124_01.htm


Interviewing
The "Art" of Interviewing requires advance preparation and an understanding of the important role that strong communication skills play in this process. Motivation, Enthusiasm, and competent Communication skills are key attributes to market in the interview. The following links provide a comprehensive overview of the interviewing process. Additional information is readily available in the Career Resource Center, and via many career-related web sites.

Read more:
http://www.vanderbilt.edu/career/sa_job_4.html


Network, Interview and Negotiate
http://www.rileyguide.com/netintv.html


What is a Resume?
A resume is a brief highlight of your work or activity experiences, educational background, and skills as they relate to the type of job you are seeking. A resume is designed to get you an interview, so market yourself effectively to your reader!

Read more:
http://www.sc.edu/career/pdf/resume.pdf   (PDF File)


Behavioral Questions
Questions that interviewers can ask a potential employee.

Read more:
http://www.sc.edu/career/pdf/behavioral.pdf   (PDF File)
http://www.sc.edu/career/pdf/employerquest.pdf   (PDF File)


Illegal or Impermissible Questions
Questions that cannot be asked by interviewers.

Read more:
http://www.sc.edu/career/pdf/illegalquest.pdf   (PDF File)


Questions to Ask In An Interview
Designed to be a two-way conversation, the interview provides both parties sufficient information on which to base an employment decision. Candidates need information on company background,
department, job, work environment, promotional opportunities and compensation/benefits.

Read more:
http://www.sc.edu/career/pdf/interviewee.pdf   (PDF File)


RESUMES


The Resume-Internship Connection

Think resumes are just for seniors launching a job search? Think again. Resumes are now commonly required of undergraduates applying for internships, co-ops, and other experiential programs. Yet, requests for a resume as part of the internship application process still catch many students by surprise!

Read more:
http://www.jobweb.com/resources/library/InternCoop_Programs/The_ResumeInternship_155_01.htm


What Is a Scannable Resume?
As human resources departments become smaller, scannable resumes are becoming more popular. Scanning resumes involves sending a hard copy of a resume through a computer with an OCR (optical character recognition) program. The resume can then be read by the computer program and may be categorized or rated for positions based on specific job standards.

Read more:
http://www.sc.edu/career/pdf/scanresume.pdf   (PDF File)


Resumes, Interviews, Cover Letters and Other Documents
http://www.jobweb.com/Resumes_Interviews/default.htm


Differences between a Resume and Vita
http://www.sc.edu/career/pdf/vita.pdf   (PDF File


Resume Tutor
While ResumeTutor! won't actually write a resume for you, it will teach you a lot about how to write a resume. However, before you catch a full-blown case of ResumeTutor!, we recommend you click on some of these "Frequently Asked Questions". They are a good introduction to this Web site. When you're ready to begin ResumeTutor, scroll to the bottom of this screen and click on one of the six steps! You'll be on your way!

Read more:
http://www1.umn.edu/ohr/ecep/resume/index.htm


Online Resumes
Today's job market requires a highly effective resumé to capture the employer's attention. Based on a national survey I conducted of 600 Hiring Managers, here are 21 ways to help you improve your online resumé.

Read more:
http://msn.careerbuilder.com/Custom/MSN/CareerAdvice/421.htm


Design Your Resume to Land an Internship
Will you be looking for that perfect internship to expand your horizons and build your experience base?If your answer is "yes," you must have an up-to-date resume, ready to go at all times. A well-constructed resume, identifying your goals, academic background, skills, experience, and activities, is just as necessary for the internship search as it is will be for your job search later on

Read more:
http://www.jobweb.com/resources/library/InternCoop_Programs/Internships_249_01.htm


Developing Your Resume
Conventional wisdom says that most prospective employers will spend 30 seconds or less reviewing an individual resume. To ensure that your resume gets the attention it deserves, we recommend that all Thayer School students and alumni/ae use the following guidelines in developing resumes.

Read more:
http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/thayer/career/handouts/resume.html


COVER LETTERS


The Ten Most Frequently Asked Questions About Cover Letters
Downsizing. Rightsizing. Corporate restructuring. You've heard the buzzwords. You're terrified. And you're ready with a spanking, new resume. But at a time when employers are inundated with resumes, how can you make yours stand out in the crowd?

Read more:
http://www.quintcareers.com/edge.html


The Basics of a Dynamic Cover Letter
What is a cover letter? Also known as a letter of introduction, letter of application, transmittal letter, or broadcast letter, it's a letter that no smart job-seeker should send his or her resume without. Few employers seriously consider a resume that is not accompanied by a cover letter; thus, a dynamically written cover letter needs to be part of your job-search strategy.

Read more:
http://www.quintcareers.com/cover_letter_basics.html


Cover Letter Checklist

Your cover letter (also sometimes referred to as a letter of introduction, letter of application, or employment letter) is a vital part of your job-search correspondence package.

Read more:
http://www.quintcareers.com/cover_letter_checklist.html


Cover Letter Resources for Job-Seekers
What follows is a collection of the best cover letter tools and resources, including articles, tutorials, and samples.

Read more:
http://www.quintcareers.com/covres.html


Cover Letters and Other Job Search Correspondence
http://www.rileyguide.com/letters.html

The Art and Science of Writing Cover Letters
If you think you don't need to put much effort into writing cover letters -- or don't need to send them at all because nobody reads them - think again. True, many human resource recruiters, headhunters and department heads don't have time to.

Read more:
http://www.wpi.edu/Admin/CDC/Students/Forms/coverletter.htm


Writing Cover Letters
A cover letter (sometimes called a letter of inquiry or letter of application) is a one page, business-style letter that accompanies every resume you send to prospective employers. The purpose of a cover letter is to get the employer to read your resume; it serves as an introduction, telling the employer who you are and why you are sending a resume. If written well, your letter lets you highlight the special features of your education and experience that qualify you for the particular position or organization

Read more:
http://engineering.dartmouth.edu/thayer/career/handouts/coverletter.html


THANK YOU LETTERS

About Writing Thank You Letters
Don't underestimate the power of a thank you letter. Also called a follow up letter, it may be the deciding factor in your favor, especially when there are other candidates with your qualifications applying for the same job. Immediately after a round of interviews, always send a thank you letter to each of your interviewers by fax, mail or email.

Read more:
http://jobsearchtech.about.com/od/thankyouletters/l/aa041398.htm


Interview Follow Up
Following an interview, promptly (within 2 business days) write the interviewer a letter expressing appreciation and thanks for the interview. 

Read more:
http://www.career.vt.edu/JOBSEARC/interview/after.htm

 

 

 

 

 
courtesy of Southampton College, Long Island University
   

 

 
© 2006 Ventures In Education, Inc.