Financial Aid Information and Resources

How can you afford college? Many students are eligible for financial aid or money that is supplied by a source other than family to pay for post secondary education. Aid can come from the federal or state government, from a post-secondary institution or can be from a private source. Financial aid can come in the form of scholarships or grants, loans, or work study. Aid can be merit or need-based.

The following sites provide you with additional information about financial aid and helpful resources.

Understanding Financial Aid and Additional Resources

Financial Aid Calendar
There's no need to be intimidated by the prospect of applying for financial aid. Millions of families apply for aid successfully each year. Use this calendar to stay a step ahead of deadlines -- when you're applying for aid, time is money.

Read more:
http://collegeboard.com/article/0,3868,6-30-0-23642,00.html


College Goal Sunday
College Goal Sunday is a volunteer program that helps students and families who need assistance in completing the financial aid forms, with a particular focus on helping low-income, first-generation families.

Read more:

http://www.collegegoalsundayusa.org/


College Board: Paying for College
The College Board's site can help you figure out what college really costs, and what you can afford.

Read more:
http://collegeboard.com/pay


FinAid
This is one of the most comprehensive sites for demystifying the financial aid process. It has a great section of frequently asked questions and answers.

Read more:
http://www.finaid.org


Hobson's Publishing Company: Financial Aid Office
CollegeView's Financial Aid Office offers extensive information and tools designed to help you determine and understand the costs associated with higher education.

Read more:
http://www.collegeview.com/financial_aid/


U.S. News and World Report
U.S. News and World Report provides extensive information about financial aid.

Read more:
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/dollars/dshome.htm


Your Future: A Practical Guide to Financing Your Education
If you're considering continuing your education after high school, you have a lot to think about such things as choosing a job or career, selecting the right school at which to pursue your education or training, and finding a way to pay for your education. These are major decisions you and your family must make as you plan for your future.

Read more:
http://www.adventuresineducation.org/links/your_future/your_future.cfm


Student Aid on the Web
Find out what you need to do to prepare for education beyond high school. Education beyond high school can give you choices that may not otherwise be possible, open doors to better paying positions and give you the opportunity to do the things you enjoy most. By advancing your education, you can expand your possibilities and increase your career choices.

Read more:
http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/preparing.jsp


Understanding Financial Aid
Financial Aid is money supplied by a source other than the family to help pay for education costs after high school. Ventures Scholars can receive aid through a variety of sources such as scholarships, grants, loans, and work-study at the college/university. Also, aid is provided through the Federal Government, State, the college/university, as well as private resources. Categories of financial aid include merit-based (academic achievements), need-based (socio-economic status), and non need-based (athletics, etc.). These sites provide an understanding of financial aid definitions.

Read more:
http://www.educaid.com/learningcenter/financialaid.htm


Getting Ready to Pay for College: What Students and Their Parents Know About the Cost of College Tuition and What They Are Doing to Find Out
NEW NCES REPORT: "Getting Ready to Pay for College: What Students and Their Parents Know About the Cost of College Tuition and What They Are Doing to Find Out" uses data from the Parent and Youth Surveys of the 1999 National Household Education Surveys Program (NHES: 1999) to investigate how much college bound 6th- through 12th-grade students know about the cost of attending college, and the relationships between their knowledge of college costs and how they go about preparing for college.

Read more:
http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2003030


Cash for College from National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA)
Getting the education you want is possible. College isn’t easy, but education after high school is within your reach. Succeeding is up to you. This site answers many questions you might have pertaining to financial aid.

Read more:
http://www.nasfaa.org/SubHomes/Cash4college/index2.html


Student's Rights and Responsibilities
Students applying to college have the right to certain information about colleges and universities, and about how much it costs to go to college. The U.S. government requires that colleges and universities provide prospective students with the following information.

Read more:
http://www.nacac.com/downloads/policy_student_rights2.pdf    (PDF File)


Glossary of Financial Aid Words
Confused about some of the financial aid words? Here is a glossary.

Read more:
http://www.nasfaa.org/SubHomes/DoItAffordIt/glossary.asp


Focus on Financial Aid: An Introduction
The unsettling news is that a year at most colleges, especially if living costs are included, starts at about $8,000 and can exceed $40,000. The good news is that if you need financial aid to help meet college costs, you are likely to receive it. So, this advice is worth remembering: cost should never be a deterrent in choosing the colleges to which you will apply.

Read more:
http://www.nacacnet.org/MemberPortal/News/StepsNewsletter/Focus+on+Financial+Aid.htm

Cash for College
Great comprehensive guide to helping you understand the financial aid process.

Read more:
http://www.nasfaa.org/AnnualPubs/CashforCollege.PDF

Financial Aid: You Can Afford It

College is one of the biggest investments you and your family will ever make. This web site provides you with concrete information and advice about finding and applying for financial aid.

Read more:
http://www.nasfaa.org/SubHomes/DoItAffordIt/afforditcover.html

Step by Step to Complete the FAFSA
This information has been provided by the State University of New York. (www.suny.edu) and can be used as a guide.

September
· Begin to search for scholarships. To start, check with colleges of interest, your parents’ places of employment, local libraries, high schools, and the web.

November
· Obtain your federal Personal Identification Number (PIN). You and your parent must each request a PIN at www.pin.ed.gov You will need it to complete the FAFSA.

December
· Start a financial aid folder. In this folder, you will keep all financial aid documents organized. Information you should collect for your financial aid folder:

--Your social security number
--Your parents’ social security numbers and dates of birth
--Your parents’ marital status
--Tax returns for your and your parents
--WSs for you and your parents
--Records of untaxed income for you and your parents (such as social security benefits, public assistance, etc.)
--Bank, stock, real estate, and business records for you and your parents
--Your driver’s license number
--Your alien registration number (for non U.S. citizens)
--PINS for you and one parent

January
· File the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The fastest way to file is online at www.fafsa.ed.gov You and one parent should use your PINS to sign the FAFSA. You may use your last pay stub or your most recent tax return as estimates on the FAFSA, if you and your parent have not yet filed a tax return.
· Watch your email for a notice from the U.S. Department of Education with a link to access your Student Aid Report (SAR).
· You may request a paper FAFSA form at the SUNY MRC or by calling 800-4FEDAID. The paper FAFSA takes 4 to 6 weeks to process.

February
· Make corrections to the FAFSA using your filed tax return.
· You should call 800-4FEDAID if you have submitted your FAFSA and have not received your SAR.
· Contact the financial aid offices at the colleges that you included on the FAFSA to verify that they have received your SAR information, and to make sure your information is complete.

April
· Watch the mail for financial aid award letters.
· Compare financial aid packages from different schools and choose your college.

May
· Notify the college of your choice.
· Apply for federal Stafford loans as needed.

Additional State Financial Aid Resources

Each state has its own programs to assist students to get into college.

Finding Out About Financial Aid at the State Level
Education Resource Organizations Directory (EROD) provides information on the state's education programs, colleges and universities, financial aid assistance programs, grants, scholarships, continuing education programs, and career opportunities. Share this site with your parents/guardians.

Read more:
http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/Programs/EROD/org_list.cfm?category_ID=SHE



State Education Departments and Boards

Take time to learn about your state's scholarship opportunities and other higher education opportunities. You might need to peruse the site to access the appropriate information.

Read more:
http://www.statelocalgov.net/50states-education.cfm


College Savings Plans Network
Source for state-operated college savings programs. These programs, directed by non-profit state organizations, offer tremendous tax benefits to families.

Read more:
http://www.collegesavings.org/


Savingforcollege.com
Every state offers college savings plans. Find out about the plans that are offered in your state.

Read more:
http://www.savingforcollege.com/about/

FAFSA and CSS Profile

U.S. Department of Education Free Application for Federal Student Aid
This site provides an electronic form you must complete in order to receive Federal Student Aid. You can submit this form by mail or at this site using the Internet.

Read more:
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/


Before Beginning a FAFSA - Overview
Not sure how to begin completing the FAFSA form? This site is extremely helpful.

Read more:
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov/before001.htm

FAFSA Online
FAFSA Online provides you with assistance in completing the FAFSA on paper or online with our comprehensive tutorials, frequently asked questions and answers, secrets to maximizing your federal financial aid, and more. Here are some great starting points:

Read more:
http://www.fafsaonline.com/


Completing Your FAFSA Form (Free Application for Federal Student Aid)
By law, you can't file your FAFSA before January 1; however, you should complete the FAFSA as soon as possible after January 1 of the year for which you are requesting financial aid. Why? Aid is generally awarded on a first-come, first-served basis, and a late application may cause you to miss out on available funding.

Read more:
http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/completing_fafsa/index.html


CSS Profile
PROFILE is a program of the College Board-a national, nonprofit association of schools and school systems, colleges and universities, and educational organizations. Many colleges, universities, graduate and professional schools, and scholarship programs use the information collected on PROFILE to help them award nonfederal student aid funds. The College Board does not award scholarship money or other financial aid. The PROFILE Application is customized for you based on the information you give when you register for the service. By completing PROFILE, you are able to give a complete picture of your family’s financial circumstances, including explanations about special circumstances, on a single application.

Read more:
http://profileonline.collegeboard.com/index.jsp



CSS Profile
The PROFILE form is administered by the College Scholarship Service (CSS), the financial aid division of the College Board. The CSS PROFILE is required by many private colleges and universities to determine your eligibility for non-government financial aid, such as the institution's own grants, loans and scholarships. The CSS PROFILE was formerly known as the FAF.

Read more:
http://www.finaid.org/fafsa/cssprofile.phtml

Financial Aid Award Letters

Understanding Acceptance and Financial Award Letters
You peer into your mailbox. You hesitate, then muster up the courage to open the letter and behold! It begins with a hearty "Congratulations!" Take a deep breath-you're in! But don't stop there-read on. There's important information in that letter. You may have some decisions to make and deadlines to meet.

Read more:
http://www.usafunds.wiredscholar.com/deciding/content/ac_accltr.jsp
http://www.princetonreview.com/college/finance/articles/compare/aidawardletter.asp
http://www.academictips.org/acad/financialsuggestions.html
http://channels.netscape.com/ns/news/package.jsp?name=fte/freshmenfail/freshmenfail


Compare Your Aid Awards
This site provides an easy way for you to compare your aid awards.

Read more:
http://applyforms.collegeboard.com/adms/tools/calculator_tool.htm


Understanding Award Letters
If you've applied for financial aid at a school to which you've been accepted, you and your family will soon find out exactly how much financial support the school is able to provide for the upcoming year. You'll receive your award letter with the acceptance letter, or shortly thereafter. Some schools even have their award letters available online. The aid offered can range from scholarships and grants to work-study and loans. This section will help you understand your award letter.

Read more:
http://www.wiredscholar.com/deciding/content/ac_awdltr.jsp

Financial Need Estimators

College Savings Calculator
Use this calculator to see how much money you'll need for college, whether you're on track to save enough, and what you need to do to reach your goal.

Read more:
http://apps.collegeboard.com/fincalc/college_savings.jsp
http://www.act.org/fane/index.html
http://www.adventuresineducation.org/ecce/cac80C142start.html
http://www.wiredscholar.com/paying/content/pay_cost.jsp


WiredScholar.com
Get advice on how much money you will need, and where to find it, interpret your acceptance and financial-aid award letters, and learn about potential lenders, and how to borrow responsibly.

Read more:
http://bridges.wiredscholar.com/

 

Loans

Borrowing for College
You may be surprised to learn how much college will cost. Factor in your living and school expenses, plus any other debts or unforeseen costs and you may find yourself a little short on cash. After exhausting other types of aid, you might consider a student loan as part of your financial plan. Prior to borrowing, consider the responsibility that comes with taking out a student loan, because what you borrow today will affect your future plans tomorrow.

Read more:
http://www.edfund.org/students/studentpar.cfm?edfpage=/students/managing/borrowing.html#slb


Student Loans
Can you answer these student loan questions? What federal loan programs are offered at your school? What federal loan programs are offered at your school? What types of loans are you eligible for? What about your parents? How much money can you borrow? What interest rate is charged on your loans? How does the federal government subsidize loan payments? When do you need to start repaying your loan? What are your repayment options?

Read more:
http://www.wiredscholar.com/financing/content/index.jsp


Life Cycle of a Loan
Taking out a loan to pay for education expenses is more than simply signing a promissory note; it is also a financial obligation that must be repaid once you leave school. The process of borrowing a loan involves many steps and many organizations, which vary depending on the type of loan you receive.

Read more:
http://www.nelliemae.com/loancenter/loan_lifecycle.html


TERI Educational Loans
At The Education Resources Institute (TERI) we are committed to helping families plan and pay for college. Through our college information services, we help students and families with career decisions, select colleges, navigate the financial aid process, and find resources. In addition, we realize many people need help filling the financial aid gap. To help meet this need TERI offers loans based on good credit, with no income limitations, for elementary and secondary, undergraduate, graduate and continuing education studies. Founded in 1985 as a nonprofit organization, TERI has assisted nearly one million students and over 6,000 colleges and universities worldwide.

Read more:
http://www.teri.org/loan-center/index.asp


Information for Borrowers
When you take out a student loan, you have certain responsibilities.

Read more:
http://studentaid.ed.gov/students/publications/student_guide/2005-2006/english/borrower-information.htm


Deferment Forms
A deferment is a period in which repayment of the principal balance is postponed. During a deferment, if the loan is subsidized, the government pays the interest charged. For Direct Unsubsidized, PLUS, Unsubsidized Consolidation, and PLUS Consolidation Loans in deferment, you are responsible for the interest that accrues during the deferment period. If you have unsubsidized loans, when you re-enter repayment at the end of the deferment period, any unpaid interest capitalizes (is added to the principal balance).

Read more:
http://www.dlssonline.com/defer/defer-list.asp?ParentURL=%2Fdefer%2Fdefer%2Dlist%2Easp

Forbearance Forms
A forbearance is an arrangement to postpone or reduce your monthly payment amount for a limited and specific period during which you are charged interest. If you indicate a temporary inability, but willingness to pay the loan(s), you may ask for or be offered a forbearance.

Read more:
http://www.dlssonline.com/forb/forb-list.asp

Loan Consolidation Forms
The Direct Loan Program offers Consolidation Loans for eligible education loan(s). You can use these forms for the application process.

Read more:
http://www.dlssonline.com/LCForms/lc-list.asp

Defaulting on School Loans
This section of FinAid provides information to students who are thinking about defaulting on their loans. It summarizes the consequences of default, gives advice on how to avoid it and, if you're already in default, how to get out of it.

Read more:
http://finaid.org/loans/default.phtml

SallieMae
This is a comprehensive source of information about paying for college with particular emphasis on borrowing money. There is a scholarship search as well as numbers for counselors and parents to call with financial aid questions.

Read more:
http://www.salliemae.com/


NellieMae
This is a good source for information on student loans available through Nellie Mae.

Read more:
http://www.nelliemae.com/


What’s So Special about Federal Loans?
If you're just starting to look into financial aid, you may be wondering what's so special about federal loans—after all, you have pay them back with interest, right? (Yep, that's right!)

Read more:
http://blog.wellsfargo.com/StudentLoanDown/2007/01/whats_so_special_about_federal.html

Student Loans
Depending on the type of loan that is offered to you in your financial aid package, some will be private loans, or government loans. Some can be taken out by students, and some by parents. Parents often consider home equity loans in order to send their children to college. A home equity loan is tax deductible, and the interest significantly lower, because the home is used as collateral.

Read more:
http://www.directdegree.com/distance_learning_resource/paying_for_college/understanding_student_loans.html?code=VEN-DDD

Loans and Debt

Consolidating Your Student Loans
Know the benefits and disadvantages of combining multiple loans into one.
If you borrow a number of student loans while you're in school, you might have trouble keeping up with all the payments when it comes time. Consolidating your loans might help.

Read more:
http://www.adventuresineducation.org/College/Paying/Earning/Repayment/consolidation.cfm


Take Control of College Debt
Two-thirds of students borrow to pay for college. One in 10 have loans of $35,000 or more. Do you have to go broke to get a B.A.? Not with these moves you don't.

When Jessica Barba was deciding where to go to college, she didn't factor how much she'd have to borrow into the equation.

She knew that her parents could afford to contribute only a few thousand dollars and that she'd have to make up the rest. But all the Virginia native could think about was how much she wanted to live in New York City.

Read more:
http://money.cnn.com/magazines/moneymag/moneymag_archive/2006/09/01/8384574/index.htm?postversion=2006083010

Student Debt Burden
College student enrollment across the United States has steadily increased over the past decade, with more than 17 million citizens participating in higher education today. The good news is that thousands of newly trained workers are moving our social and economic enterprises forward each year. The bad news is that tens of thousands more students are accumulating record levels of debt. As state and federal support for higher education continues to tighten, students are increasingly picking up the slack. This trend is not slowing down; in fact, student debt has risen significantly over the past decade.

Read more:
http://www.aascu.org/policy_matters/v3_8/default.htm

Students Suffocate Under Tens of Thousands in Loans
Tom Dillon, 19, a pre-pharmacy major at the University of Connecticut, is carrying $52,000 in student loans. And he's just getting started. When he gets his pharmacy doctorate in four years, he expects his debt to exceed $150,000. Dillon's been drawn to pharmacy since age 5, when he found out he had epilepsy.

Read more:
http://www.usatoday.com/money/perfi/general/2006-02-22-student-loans-usat_x.htm

How to Avoid the Student Loan Trap
One of the most common laments I hear from 20-somethings (and often 30-somethings) is that they wish they had not borrowed so much money for college, had managed their student loans better, and in general had managed their money better while in college. Then they wouldn't be struggling so much after college to make ends meet and pay their student loan obligations. Some of these young adults are worse off financially than they were in college.

Read more:
http://financialplan.about.com/od/moneyandcollegestudents/a/StudentLoans.htm

Athletics

College Athletics
A free tool for students seeking to combine athletics with academics at a Division III college.

Read more:
http://www.collegestudentathletes.com/index.cfm


National Collegiate Athletic Association
Welcome to the NCAA Clearinghouse website. This site will provide you with information about initial-eligibility at NCAA Division I and II member colleges and universities.

Read more:

https://www.ncaaclearinghouse.net/NCAA/common/index.html


Undocumented Students

Financial Aid and Scholarships for Undocumented Students
This page contains information about financial aid and scholarships for undocumented students and illegal aliens. (The terms "undocumented student", "illegal alien", and "illegal immigrant" are used interchangeably and intentionally in this page to enable this page to be found by students who are trying to find information about scholarships for undocumented students.)

Read more:
http://www.finaid.org/otheraid/undocumented.phtml


U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
On March 1, 2003, service and benefit functions of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) transitioned into the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Read more:
http://uscis.gov/graphics/index.htm


Undocumented Students
If you are undocumented, you can still go to college.

Read more:
http://www.tericollegeaccess.org/plan/advimmig.html

Financial Aid and Scholarship Information for Undocumented Students
Financial aid is generally not provided to undocumented students or illegal aliens. Federal and state financial aid programs require the recipient to have U.S. citizenship or permanent residency (i.e., have a green card).

Read more:
http://www.nygearup.org/collegesense/expert/undocumented/index.htm


Resources for Undocumented Students
Though this article focuses on California's undocumented students, it provides a wealth of information for all.

Read more:
http://www.unitela.com/AB540Resources.ppt
The Immigration Portal
Link to helpful information.

Read more:
http://www.ilw.com/

Debt and the College Student

Money Matters
This site has been developed just for Ventures Scholars!

Read more:
http://www.venturescholar.org/moneymatters/index.html


Monthly Budget Worksheet for College Students
Think about your monthly budget in college. You can download this form.

Read more:
http://financialplan.about.com/cs/budgeting/l/blmocolbud.htm
Semester Budget Worksheet for College Students
Think about your semester budget in college. You can download this form.

Read more:

http://financialplan.about.com/library/blsemcolbud.htm

School Year Budget Worksheet for College Students
Think about your yearly budget in college. You can download this form.

Read more:
http://financialplan.about.com/library/blyrcolbud.htm

Leave College Without Credit Card Debt
You're in college, so it's too early to be thinking of having a personal financial plan. That's for after you graduate and you're making the big bucks, right?

Read more:
http://financialplan.about.com/cs/college/a/MoneyCollege.htm/

Becoming Credit Wise
A comprehensive booklet about borrowing wisely.

Read more:
http://www.studentaid.org/CreditWise.pdf

YoungMoney.com
Good articles about credit vs. debt.

Read more:
http://www.youngmoney.com/credit_debt/credit_basics

Self-Control Key to Managing Credit Card Debt in College
College offers a unique opportunity to experiment. Away from your parents' watchful eyes, you can shave your head, join a rock-climbing expedition or get a tattoo. But if you use credit cards to finance your adventures, you could end up with debts that will linger longer than the Harley-Davidson logo adorning your backside.

Read more:
http://www.usatoday.com/money/perfi/columnist/block/2003-08-11-ym_x.htm

Managing Credit as a College Student
If your mailbox is not already full of credit card offers, it soon will be! Credit card issuers often solicit college students - they want to get their credit cards in your hands because you are likely to keep your first credit card for a very long time. Because of the many opportunities you will be presented with to establish credit, it is important that you understand and manage your credit wisely. Decisions you make today about credit can affect you for years to come.

Read more:
http://www.umsl.edu/services/finance/mng-cr.htm

The Credit Crunch
Managing your credit while in college is as difficult as managing it after college. If you think you'll accumulate consumer debt and will, or already have student loans, consider their overall effects. Make careful decisions based on long-term goals as these debts are reflected on your credit report and can have a long-standing impact on your future goals.

Read more:
http://www.edfund.org/students/studentpar.cfm?edfPage=/students/managing/credit_crunch.html

FINANCIAL AID LINKS FOR GRADUATE/PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL


Financial Aid and Loans for Graduate Students
Let's begin with some general advice: Graduate Student Financial Aid and Scholarships are limited.

Read more:
http://www.gradloans.com/fa101/index.shtml


Graduate Loans : Federal and Alternative Graduate Student Loans
Your graduate financial aid award package will tell you what types of education loan programs you are eligible to accept. Generally, your financial aid package will be composed of four types of aid.

Read more:
http://www.gradloans.com/grad/index.shtml

How Much Does Medical School Cost and Can I Afford It?
Annual tuition and fees at state medical schools in 1999 averaged $11,375 for state residents and $25,195 for non-residents. At private schools, tuition and fees averaged $26,991 for residents and $28,733 for nonresidents. These figures do not include housing or living expenses. But don't let these costs discourage you. A wide array of grants and loans are available to those who are determined to get a medical education. About 81 percent of medical students borrow money to cover their expenses. Many receive substantial financial assistance through programs that provide loans guaranteed by the federal government.

Read more:
http://www.aamc.org/students/considering/financial.htm


Phase I - The Premedical Years
The first phase of (MD) 2 will help you identify your advisors, funding sources and develop your personal strategy for financing your medical education.

Read more:
http://www.aamc.org/students/financing/md2/phase1/start.htm


Make the Financial Aid Connection
Connecting with the right financial aid providers is vital to financing your educational goals. While your ultimate goal may be to earn your degree, an often-overlooked goal is to avoid compromising your post-degree options by over-leveraging your future. In other words, graduating with more debt than you can handle does not make for a smart start in your post-grad school career.

Read more:
http://www.princetonreview.com/grad/finance/articles/loans/finaidmatch.asp
Financing Graduate School
So you want to go to graduate school, but think you can't afford it? Got too many loans already? Parents fed up with supporting you and wondering why you don't go out and get a job? Are you a good student? Read on; in the best of all worlds, you not only can get into graduate school, but also get paid while there.

Read more:
http://www.salisbury.edu/careerservices/Students/Graduate%20Studies/Finance.htm

Paying for School: An Introduction to Financial Aid
If you're thinking about going to graduate school but are worried about how you're going to pay for it, or you're confused by all the funding options that are available, rest assured. We can help. With a little explanation in plain English, we can tell you not only what these options mean, but what they mean to you.

Read more:
http://www.gradschools.com/info/articles/intro_financial_aid.html
Student Loan Consolidation - Why All the Fuss?
By now, you've heard the shouts of lenders, all tempting you to consolidate your federal student loans. But just what is consolidation? And how do you know if it's the right choice for you?

Read more:
http://www.gradschools.com/info/articles/loan_consolidation.html

Determine How Much You Should Borrow
You've faced reality and realized you'll have to borrow student loans to help finance your education. Before you sign any promissory notes, the first step you should take is to determine how much you should borrow. How much you should borrow depends on the following factors: cost of attendance as established by your school; loan limits established by the federal government and other lenders; your existing financial commitments, such as car loans or mortgages; other resources you may have, such as savings accounts; and the amount of debt you can afford to repay once you graduate.

Read more:
http://www.gradschools.com/info/articles/howmuchtoborrow.html


Grants in Graduate Studies (GIGS)
GIGS is a database of grants for graduate and post-graduate students, provided by U.S. government, international, corporate and private funding agencies, in addition to grants from departments within New York University.

Read more:
http://www.nyu.edu/gsas/fininfo/gigs.html


Cornell University Graduate School Fellowship Database
The Cornell University Graduate School Fellowship Database primarily lists fellowships from non-Cornell sources. Anyone interested in consulting the database is welcome to do so. Please browse the topics below or type in your own keyword search ("Einstein," "Kenya," "molecular biology," "January," etc.). Further inquiries regarding fellowships listed in the database should be directed to the sponsoring organization, rather than the Cornell Graduate Fellowships office. The Fellowships office limits its responses to requests for information from prospective applicants to Cornell and from current Cornell graduate students.

Read more:
http://cuinfo.cornell.edu/Student/GRFN/


Financing a Graduate Education
How to pay for graduate school is the major question for most people. There are three basic ways to finance your graduate education, depending upon the kind of program in which you are interested: fellowships and traineeships, teaching and research assistantships, and loans. Even those who are able to finance their graduate education "out of their own pockets" should understand the other options, as, in the case of traineeships and teaching assistantships, they often involve the acquisition of skills and knowledge critical to a successful graduate school career.

Read more:
http://www.cgsnet.org/ResourcesForStudents/financing.htm


Stipends for Study in Mathematics
A list of stipend opportunities for graduate study in mathematics compiled by the AMS.

Read more:
http://72.14.207.104/search?q=cache:XVO42Na_QYAJ:
www.ams.org/notices/200508/stipends.pdf&hl=en

AC/SMART GRANT

AC/SMART GRANT
To meet the growing need for improved math and science instruction, on Feb. 8, 2006 President Bush signed into law two new student grant programs -- the Academic Competitiveness Grants and National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants. Today, the U.S. Department of Education announced guidelines to make these grants available to college students in the 2006-07 academic year.

Click here to learn about the AC/SMART grant information.

 





 

 
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