Choosing a Major

Take a few minutes to read about these important topics:


Choosing a Major

These links will provide you with information about how to choose a major or develop a career pathway.

Choosing a Major: Do What You LOVE
Choosing a major can be overwhelming. It may seem like a critical task; but in reality, the choice you make will not restrict you to a defined career down the road. It is likely that you will change your major at least once. Your interests, as well as your goals and values, are likely to change during four years.

Read more:
http://cdc.richmond.edu/studentsalumni/majors/choosingmajor.html


Welcome to the Career Journey
This site is sponsored by University of Richmond and has some helpful information.

Read more:
http://cdc.richmond.edu/orientation/fyorient.html


Choosing a College Major: How to Chart Your Ideal Path
The most important piece of advice in this article follows this sentence, so please make note of it and repeat it to yourself as often as you need as you read this article and make decisions regarding choosing a major in college. Are you ready for it? The advice: Don't panic.

Read more:
http://www.quintcareers.com/choosing_major.html


Taking the Mystery Out of Majors
If you're the type of student who has higher hopes for your college career, the following is a list of frequently asked questions about college majors that should help reduce some of the confusion.

Read more:
www.princetonreview.com/college/research/articles/majors/choosemajor.asp


Resources about Majors
This site has a tremendous amount of information and provides you with additional resources. 

Read more:
http://cdc.richmond.edu:591/metadatabase2/FMPro?-
db=resources.FP3&-lay=allfields&-format=majorsearch.htm&-view


Choosing and Using Your Major

Most college students think a corresponding academic major exists for each specific career field, and that it's impossible to enter most career fields unless they choose that matching major for undergraduate study. This is not true!

Read more:
http://www.career.virginia.edu/students/resources/handouts/choosing_a_major.pdf


Fishing for a College Major - Thinking About Your Career
As you begin to think about your college major, more likely than not thoughts and questions about what you'll do with your life after college will creep into your mind. Will a degree in Music Theory help you feed your children and pay the utility bills? Do you need to major in economics to become an entrepreneur? Can you major in philosophy and still go on to medical school and become a doctor?

Read more:
http://www.townsend-outlook.com/edits_college/ed-prep/fishing_for_a_major.html


Ten Tips For Selecting a Major

If you are undecided about your major, you are in good company. “Undeclared” is one of the most popular majors for first-year students at VCU (and probably many other colleges as well). Because you can't actually graduate with undeclared as your major, we recommend you try several strategies to make help you in selecting a program of study.

Read more:
http://www.has.vcu.edu/advising/tips.pdf



Some Common Misperceptions about Choosing a Major
Students often begin their exploration of majors with preconceived ideas about the best ways to go about choosing a major and about what impact that choice will have. Unfortunately, many of these ideas are misperceptions that can deter real progress.

Read more:
http://www.psu.edu/dus/md/mdmisper.htm


Taking the Mystery Out of Majors
If you’re the type of student who has higher hopes for your college career, the following is a list of frequently asked questions about college majors that should help reduce some of the confusion.

Read more:
http://www.princetonreview.com/college/research/articles/majors/choosemajor.asp


Choosing Your Major
If you are wondering what to major in and are asking “What can I do with a major in this?,” you’re not alone. This is a question frequently asked by undeclared students and is one of many factors that can get in the way of major and career choice. But while this question may seem to be the most logical one to ask, answers for many majors may be difficult to find. Why is this?

Read more:
http://www.jobweb.com/resources/library/Careers_In/Choosing_Your_Major_122_01.htm


How to Choose a Major and Investigate Careers
Many students are undecided about their majors when they enter college-and many who think they have decided will change their minds more than once before they graduate. Although parents and friends will keep asking you what you're majoring in, you shouldn't feel pressured to make a quick decision. There is a lot to choose from at a university of this size, and there are many factors you need to think about as you are considering potential majors. On the average, people change majors three times and careers seven times. Take time to explore your interests and your options.

Read more:
http://www.washington.edu/students/ugrad/advising/majchoos.html


The Importance of a Major
A major is the field in which you choose to specialize during your undergraduate study. Your choice determines the academic discipline that will absorb a significant portion of your academic time and energy. Upon successful completion of the major requirements and University requirements, you receive a bachelor's degree. Your major offers an opportunity to develop your intellectual skill, to show your capability in grasping a subject from the fundamentals through advanced study. What you study is an important personal decision. How you approach your study, using the academic resources available to you becomes an important measure by which you and others will evaluate your educational success or achievement. To give yourself a chance to produce your very best work, choose a subject you find stimulating. It can be difficult to excel in courses that you do not enjoy, and conversely you will naturally excel in courses that you find exciting. If you find that your major courses are drudgery, reevaluate your choice of major.

Read more:
http://www.stanford.edu/~susanz/Majors.html


Myths About Major
When selecting a major and deciding on a career direction, it is important to make the most well informed decisions possible. These decisions should be based on facts rather than myths. They should include a variety of factors -- first, your interests, values, skills, and abilities; and second, your knowledge of the career fields and job opportunities. Commonly believed myths, dispelled below, will not help you to decide on a major.

Read more:
http://ls-advise.berkeley.edu/choosingmajor/myth.html


Choosing to Double Major

Double Majors Do Double Duty
Many college students choose a major simply because it interests them. Others decide on a major that will guide them toward a specific career. But what if you want to do more?

Depending on your school, you may have more options than you think. Adding a minor or a double or dual major can enhance your academic experience and give you an advantage when job-searching after graduation.

Read more:
http://www.fastweb.com/fastweb/resources/articles/index/100841


Tips for Those Considering a Double Major
If you are not intimidated by the extra effort involved in a double major, keep the following guidelines in mind when choosing your majors. Read the fine print: A little investigation freshman year can save a lot of misery senior year. Double majoring in Physics and Biochemistry might be easier than say, Physics and History, since both Physics and Chemistry draw upon many of the same courses. Then again, it might not. Some schools have rules against overlapping courses.

Read more:
http://www.princetonreview.com/college/research/articles/majors/doublemajor.asp


Choosing a Minor

Does Your Minor Matter?
Many students spend so much energy deciding on college majors that they sometimes overlook a related –- and sometimes equally important –- question: What minor, if any, should you choose?

As with so many career issues you'll face during the college years, there is no straightforward correct answer. Insofar as prospective employers are concerned, it all depends.

Read more:
http://content.monstertrak.monster.com/resources/archive/careerfields/minor


About Minors
Although College students are not required to complete a minor, students may choose to do so to bring an element of cohesiveness to the electives.

Read more:
http://www.college.upenn.edu/curriculum/minors/#rules


Communicating With Your Advisor

Meeting with Your Advisor
To begin with, it is helpful if the advisor has a chance to meet with you outside of the rush of last minute deadlines and other distractions. It is up to you to initiate the first contact by calling or emailing your advisor to set up a time to meet. We also recommend that you determine the name and office number of the administrative staff person who supports your advisor in case you need further assistance locating or getting in touch with your advisor. Dropping in on an advisor between classes is perhaps the least effective way to establish a good advising relationship. So pick a time that works for both of you and plan to talk about the academic issues that are foremost on your agenda.

Read more:
http://www.cs.cornell.edu/degreeprogs/ugrad/uadvise/expectations/


Advisee’s Responsibilities
What you can do as an advisee.

Read more:
http://www.sa.utah.edu/advise/main_you.shtml



Selecting a Mentor

The Value of a Mentor
A mentor is that one person who can guide you, help you, take you under his or her wing, and nurture your career quest.

Read more:
http://www.quintcareers.com/mentor_value.html


Find a Mentor
Once you’ve decided you want a mentor, it may at first seem difficult to find one. There are only so many professors for a lot of students, and you may not have that many contacts with the outside world. However, here are some tips to help you in your mentor search.

Read more:
http://wish-net.od.nih.gov/college/finding_mentor.html


Mentoring Relationships
Having a mentor can help engineers and other professionals at all experience levels with objective guidance that can help chart a career path. In selecting a mentor it is important to be sure you'll both have the time to communicate, and that each can be honest about any situation.  Trust is key to a successful mentoring relationship.  Mentors can help you make the most of your education and help ease the transition from school to work. In return, mentors can pass along their experiences, interact with other professionals, learn new approaches, and keep up-to-date. Both student and mentor benefit from the relationship.

Read more:
http://www.careercornerstone.org/mentors.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 
© 2006 Ventures In Education, Inc.