Career Pathways

Are you interested in pursuing a math- or science-based career?  There are hundreds of career opportunities. This section provides you with a list of possible math- and science-related careers and offers you a variety of links to sites that can help you learn about these careers. 

If you would like to recommend a site, please email the information to webmaster@ventures.org.

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

What are the benefits of dual degree programs?


Students have a unique opportunity to simultaneously pursue two degrees (i.e. two bachelors, a bachelor and a master degree program, etc.) bachelor and master degree programs along with their full-time studies of some other programs. Some of the benefits include: Students will have the flexibility to pursue two programs simultaneously and gain a competitive edge in the job market, Students can pursue multi-disciplinary areas of study to support career goals and increase employability. Students can acquire two degrees simultaneously at the same time. Hence, time can be more productively used to acquire two qualifications.

Dual Degree Programs
A double-degree program, sometimes called a conjoint degree, dual degree, or simultaneous degree program, involves a student working for two different university degrees in parallel, either at the same institution or at different institutions (sometimes in different countries), completing them in less time than it would take to earn them separately.

Read more:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_degree

Advantages of Dual Degree Programs

Read more:
http://depts.drew.edu/phys/DualDegree/DualDegreeFAQ.htm


l

Biological and Life Sciences

The following list will provide you with ideas about careers if you are interested in Biological and Life Sciences:

--Anatomy   

--Medical Microbiology and Bacteriology   

--Biochemistry   

--Biology, General

--Biometrics, Biostatistics   

--Biophysics   

--Botany/Plant Biology   

--Cell/Cellular Biology and Histology   

--Ecology   

--Developmental Biology and Embryology   

--Entomology   

--Environmental Science   

--Genetics, General   

--Cell/Cellular Biology and Anatomical Sciences   

--Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography   

--Microbiology, General   

--Molecular Biology   

--Neuroscience   

--Nutrition Sciences   

--Physiology, General   

--Pharmacology   

--Animal Physiology   

--Plant Pathology/Phytopathology   

--Botany/Plant Biology   

--Plant Physiology   

--Radiation Biology/ Radiobiology   

--Teacher/Professor

--Toxicology   

--Zoology/Animal Biology

 


These sites will provide you with additional information about some of the aforementioned areas:

What Jobs Do Biologists Have?
The best research biologists are driven to understand how living systems work. Many practice basic research — seeking knowledge for its own sake. The results of basic research are often put to practical use by applied researchers, who try to find solutions to specific problems.

Read more:
http://www.aibs.org/careers/


Why should I become a Biologist?
Embarking on a career in biology has many paths; each with its own rewards and challenges. Which path you take will have as much to do with your personality as it does your intellectual curiosity and interests. Being a biologist can be a fulfilling and exciting profession if your own personal goals, talents and interests match the activities of biologists.

Read more:
http://www.sicb.org/careers/faqs.php3


Career Opportunities in Biology
This section includes brief descriptions of a few selected careers in biology and medicine, and how they relate to the Biology major. We have included some suggested courses for each career goal to help you think about how to organize your curriculum around your goals.

Read more:
http://www.muhlenberg.edu/depts/biology/students/careers.html


Occupations for Biology Majors Requiring a Graduate Degree

List of careers requiring a graduate degree.

Read more:
http://careercenter.tamu.edu/guides/mymajor/biol/grad.html




Biological Sciences - What can I do with this degree?
List of jobs, types of employers, and strategies to get jobs.

Read more:
http://careers.utah.edu/students/library/what%20can%20I%20do/information/biological.pdf

Finding a Job
Everything you need to know to find a job in science. Covers the application and interview process, postdocs, and both academic and nonacademic careers.

Read more:
http://www.phds.org/jobs/


Careers In Biology
Here you will find Web sites that describe specific careers accessible after training in biology. In turn, each of these is likely to provide many other links.

Read more:
http://alpha.furman.edu/~snyder/careers/careerlist.html
http://ublib.buffalo.edu/libraries/units/sel/bio/careers.html
http://www.princetonreview.com/college/research/majors/careers.asp?MajorID=47


What is Neuroscience?
Neuroscience is any one of the various branches of science concerned with growth, development and function of the nervous system.

Read more:
http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/booksh.html
http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/neurok.html


Snapshots - Bringing Students to the World of Biological Research
http://science-education.nih.gov/newsnapshots/index.html
Today, biological science--both basic research and clinical application--is booming like never before. And with so much happening in biology and medicine, science students and teachers need a vehicle for bringing the world of biological research into their science classrooms. Snapshots is created to be that vehicle.

Read more:
http://science-education.nih.gov/newsnapshots/index.html


What is Zoology?
Zoology is the branch of biology that studies animals.

http://www.biosis.org.uk/free_resources/resource_guide.html


Science Career Webs
http://www.sciencecareersweb.net/
Welcome to the Science Careers Web site! Here you will find numerous valuable resources in preparing to major in the geosciences, biological sciences, marine sciences, and beyond.

Additional Career Choices for Students Interested in Biology
http://www4.vjc.edu/Biology/stories/storyReader$85
Biologists are employed in jobs involving living things at levels ranging from molecules to cells to organisms to ecosystems. In general, biologists with bachelors degrees usually work as part of a team and are supervised by those with more advanced degrees or more experience. With graduate degrees, biologists work more independently. Those with doctorates typically direct a group of researchers carrying out projects and also may teach in colleges and universities.



What is a Veterinarian?
Doctors of veterinary medicine are medical professionals who play a significant role in the health care and welfare of animals, human public health, medical research, and public safety. They have a broad-based medical background and serve in many capacities. The following information discusses the roles of veterinarians, aspects of preparing for and applying to veterinary schools and colleges, and employment opportunities available to new veterinarians. A final section features information for those interested in becoming a veterinary technician.

Read more:
http://aavmc.org/students_admissions/career_center.htm


Careers & Jobs in Marine Biology & Oceanography
The web pages provide advice for those interested in a career in the marine or aquatic sciences.

Read more:
http://www-marine.stanford.edu/HMSweb/careers.html


Computer and Information Sciences

The following list will provide you with ideas about careers if you are interested in

Computer and Information Sciences:

--Computer Programming/Programmer, General

--Computer and Information Sciences, General   

--Data Processing and Data Processing Technology/Tec...   

--Data Systems Repair   

--Information Science/Studies   

--Computer Software and Media Applications   

--Computer Systems Analysis/Analyst   

--Robotics

--Teacher/Professor

These sites will provide you with additional information about some of the aforementioned areas:

Careers in Computing
Congratulations on choosing a career in computing! Your success will depend on the level of effort you put into your education and training. Make the most of your opportunities now for a future in computing.

Read more:
http://www.computer.org/education/careers.htm


Computer Systems Analysts, Database Administrators, and Computer Scientists
The rapid spread of computers and information technology has generated a need for highly trained workers to design and develop new hardware and software systems and to incorporate new technologies. These workers—computer systems analysts, database administrators, and computer scientists—include a wide range of computer specialists. Job tasks and occupational titles used to describe these workers evolve rapidly, reflecting new areas of specialization or changes in technology, as well as the preferences and practices of employers.

Read more:
http://stats.bls.gov/oco/ocos042.htm


Engineering

The following list will provide you with ideas about careers if you are interested in Engineering:

--Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering   

--Agricultural/Biological Engineering and Bioengineering.

--Architectural Engineering   

--Biomedical/Medical Engineering   

--Ceramic Sciences and Engineering   

--Chemical Engineering   

--Civil Engineering, General   

--Computer Engineering, General   

--Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering   

--Engineering & Public Policy   

--Engineering Mechanics   

--Engineering Physics

--Engineering Science   

--Environmental/Environmental Health Engineering   

--Geological/Geophysical Engineering   

--Geophysical Engineering   

--Industrial Engineering   

--Industrial Production Technologies/Technicians   

--Instrumentation Technology/Technician   

--Materials Engineering   

--Mechanical Engineering   

--Mechanical Engineering/Mechanical Technology/Technology

--Metallurgical Engineering   

--Mining and Mineral Engineering   

--Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering   

--Nuclear Engineering   

--Nuclear Engineering Technology/Technician   

--Ocean Engineering   

--Petroleum Engineering   

--Plastics Engineering Technology/Technician   

--Surveying Engineering   

--Construction Engineering   

--Construction Management   

--Industrial Technology/Technician   

--Manufacturing Engineering   

--Teacher/Professor


These sites will provide you with additional information about some of the aforementioned areas:

Engineering Assessment
Is there an engineer inside of you?

Read more:
http://www.engineeringedu.com/assess.htm


Sloan Career Cornerstone Center
The Sloan Career Cornerstone Center is an ever-expanding resource center for anyone interested in exploring career opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).  Explore degree fields,  comprehensive education, networking, job hunting, and career planning resources revolve around personal interviews with over 400 individuals who offer candid insight into their career paths.  There are special resources for pre-college students, and other materials for college students and early career professionals. Almost everything on this site is downloadable in PDF format, and may be reproduced.

Read more:
http://careercornerstone.org/


Discover Engineering
Are you ready to enter the Cyberchase ? Math connects to science and engineering in these activities from the popular PBS show "Cyberchase." Visit the New Faces of Engineering and meet young engineers like Tim, who designs attractions like "Revenge of the Mummy, The Ride," at Universal Studios Orlando, or Vanessa, who invents future combat systems for the Army. Sixty young engineers tell what they do at work and for fun.

Read more:
http://www.discoverengineering.org/default.asp


Engineering K-12
This site lets you explore the different engineering fields, learn how to get and pay for an engineering education, and have fun with interactive engineering games and resources. Let it be your first step in your exciting journey to becoming an engineer!

Read more:
http://www.engineeringk12.org/


The Internet Guide to Engineering, Mathematics, and Computing
Some of the material might be a bit advanced, this site provides a lengthy list of links to engineering, mathematics, and computing.

Read more:
http://www.eevl.ac.uk/


How to Become An Engineer
What are your first thoughts when you think about engineers and engineering? All stuffy suits and nerdy know-it-alls; we're talking Geeksville, Arizona right? Cast aside those misconceptions, like it or not, engineers are the ultimate trendsetters! Fact! Your high-street retailers and ad agencies may have been the first to tell you about the latest ultra-small mobile phones, the must-have fashion accessories or the latest sound systems but - wait for it - chances are that engineers were the driving force that brought these ideas from the drawing board to your shopping list.

Read more:
http://www.iee.org/oncomms/circuit/becomeanengineer/


A Sightseer's Guide to Engineering
A Sightseer's Guide to Engineering takes you to engineering creations across the United States. Find fun and stimulating destinations while learning how engineering improves our quality of life and helps make our economy go.

Read more:
http://www.engineeringsights.org/


Providing Real-World Engineering Insight and Challenges for High School Students
JETS works to increase interest and awareness of engineering and technology-based careers — with student competitions, assessment tools, career guidance resources, an e-newsletter, and more — as well as resource materials for parents and counselors. JETS programs excite high school students about careers in engineering and related technical fields and help them understand the critical role engineers play in the world around us.

Read more:
http://www.jets.org/


NASA
NASA Quest Challenges are FREE Web-based, interactive explorations designed to engage students in authentic scientific and engineering processes. The solutions relate to issues encountered daily by NASA personnel.

Read more:
http://questdb.arc.nasa.gov/archive_search.htm


Introduce a Girl to Engineering
Women are severely underrepresented in the engineering profession. Research shows that girls and young women lose interest in subjects and the fields of study leading to engineering careers long before they enter college.

Read more:
http://www.eweek.org/site/News/Eweek/girlsday.shtml


Guide Me, NACME
Engineering is one of the most exciting, challenging, important and lucrative careers you could imagine. Engineers create new technologies and computer games , develop new medicines, take us beyond the moon and improve life for us here on earth. They are doctors, lawyers, musicians, social workers, teachers and business professionals. Maybe you've heard that engineering is just for math geniuses, or the two smartest kids in class. Not true. It is true that you need to take the right courses , develop good math skills, but being an engineer takes more than that. You need to be creative, curious about how things work, interested in fixing things, and to be the kind of person who hates being told - you can't do that! If you're a dreamer willing to work hard to make your dreams come true, engineering may be your destination. You can get there from wherever you are today.

Read more:
http://www.guidemenacme.org/guideme/resources/students.jsp
Student's Frequently Asked Questions about Engineering
What are some of the different engineering disciplines? What does it take to become an engineer? What types of classes do engineering students take in college? How successful can engineers become? What can a high-school student interested in engineering do to prepare?

Read more:
http://www.swe.org/SWE/swefaq/FAQStudents.htm


Engineering (Ceramic, Chemical/Biochemical, Civil, Electrical/Computer, Industrial, Mechanical, Aerospace, Biomedical)
Are you considering a career in engineering but not sure why type of engineering? These sites give brief descriptions of the various types of engineering.

Read more:
https://www.engineering-goforit.com/
http://www.engr.rutgers.edu/coe/catalog.html


Is Engineering For You?
Engineering is the art of applying scientific and mathematical principles, experience, judgment, and common sense to make things that benefit people. Engineers design bridges and important medical equipment as well as processes for cleaning up toxic spills and systems for mass transit. In other words, engineering is the process of producing a technical product or system to meet a specific need. Engineers have many different types of jobs to choose from, including research, design, analysis, development, testing, and sales positions. If you are interested in discovering new knowledge, you might consider a career as a research engineer. If you are imaginative and creative, design engineering may be for you. The work of analytical engineers most closely resembles what you do in your mathematics and science classes. If you like laboratory courses and conducting experiments, look into becoming a development engineer. Sales engineering could be a good choice if you are persuasive and like working with people.

Read more:
http://www.asee.org/precollege/engineering.cfm


GuideMeNacme
Engineering is one of the most exciting, challenging, important and lucrative careers you could imagine. Engineers create new technologies and computer games, develop new medicines, take us beyond the moon and improve life for us here on earth. They are doctors, lawyers, musicians, social workers, teachers and business professionals.

Read more:
www.guidemenacme.org


Aerospace Online Section of NASA
Look into flight simulators and wind tunnels to see NASA employees doing aerodynamic design research. You will hear from the engineers, technicians, mechanics and designers working to make tomorrow's planes safer, more efficient, quieter, and faster.

Read more:
http://questdb.arc.nasa.gov/content_search_aero.htm


Engineer Girl from the National Academy of Engineering
Engineer Girl from the National Academy of Engineering - You'll have the power to make a difference! By becoming an engineer, you can help solve problems that are important to society. You could be controlling and preventing pollution, developing new medicines, creating advanced technologies, even exploring new worlds.

Read more:
http://www.engineergirl.org/
Biomedical Engineering Society
A Biomedical Engineer uses traditional engineering expertise to analyze and solve problems in biology and medicine, providing an overall enhancement of health care. Students choose the biomedical engineering field to be of service to people, to partake of the excitement of working with living systems, and to apply advanced technology to the complex problems of medical care. The biomedical engineer works with other health care professionals including physicians, nurses, therapists and technicians. Biomedical engineers may be called upon in a wide range of capacities: to design instruments, devices, and software, to bring together knowledge from many technical sources to develop new procedures, or to conduct research needed to solve clinical problems.

Read more:
http://www.bmes.org/


The Materials Science & Engineering Career Resource Center
If you are interested in a career in Materials Science & Engineering or just want to learn more about this exciting field you've come to the right place! This site will also be of great interest to those interested in metallurgy, ceramics, plastics, semiconductors and composites.

Read more:
http://www.crc4mse.org/


Manufacturing is Cool
SME's goal is to promote the importance of engineering and manufacturing and the interesting, desirable and challenging careers they present. Explore our new Career Information and Opportunities area to learn about manufacturing (and other) engineering careers, salary information, accredited schools with manufacturing engineering/technology programs and interesting articles about people in engineering careers.

Read more:
http://www.manufacturingiscool.com/


Future Scientists and Engineers of America
FSEA gives students an opportunity to experience real engineering and science with a practical, hands on method which uses projects that challenge student teams to creatively solve problems.  FSEA team members experience the same process an engineer or scientist experiences, i.e., given an objective, using techniques of innovation, design, creativity, trial and error, how well can that objective be met?  FSEA makes learning fun.

Read more:
http://www.fsea.org/
Metallurgical Engineering Web Sites!
The Materials Science and Engineering Career Resource Center – Great resource if you are interested in a career in materials science and engineering or just want to learn more about it.

Read more:
http://www.crc4mse.org/

. The Great Idea Finder
Not all ideas provide a benefit to the world population. Not all inventors become overnight millionaires. Some of the best ideas were never successful. Some invention potentials were never recognized by their inventors. Take a glimpse into the past at some of the more unusual inventions and how they came to be, or not to be.

Read more:
http://www.ideafinder.com/home.htm

Career Field - Engineering & Physical Sciences
Many links to engineering sites.

Read more:
http://career.berkeley.edu/Engineering/Engineering.stm


Health Professions and Allied Services

The following list will provide you with ideas about careers if you are interested in Health Professions and Allied Services:


--Chiropractic (DC)   

--Dental Support Services and Allied Professions   

--Dental Laboratory Technology/Technician   

--Allied Health Diagnostic, Intervention, and Treatment

--Environmental Health   

--Hospital and Health Care Facilities Administration   

--Allied Health and Medical Assisting Services   

--Clinical/Medical Laboratory Science and Allied Professionals   

--Health and Medical Administrative Services   

--Mental and Social Health Services and Allied Professionals

--Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist   

--Nurse Anesthetist   

--Nursing - Registered Nurse Training (Rn, Asn, Bsn)   

--Occupational Therapy/Therapist   

--Optometry (Od)   

--Osteopathic Medicine/Osteopathy (Do)   

--Pharmacy (Pharmd, Bs/Bpharm)   

--Physical Therapy/Therapist   

--Physician Assistant   

--Podiatric Medicine/Podiatry (Dpm)   

--Pre-Dentistry Studies   

--Pre-Medicine/Pre-Medical Studies   

--Pre-Veterinary Studies   

--Public Health, General (Mph, Dph)   

--Radiologic Technology/Science - Radiographer   

--Radiology, X-Ray Tech   

--Teacher/Professor

--Therapeutic Recreation/Recreational Therapy   

--Communication Disorders, General   

--Sports Medicine   

--Surgical Technology/Technologist   

--Gerontology

--Respiratory Care Therapy/Therapist   

--Music Therapy/Therapist   

--Dietetics and Clinical Nutrition Services   

These sites will provide you with additional information about some of the aforementioned areas:

Ventures Scholars Program Professional Association Members
There are many professional associations that have joined the Ventures Scholars Program.  The representatives are eager to answer your questions. 

Read more:
http://www.venturescholar.org/hs/associntro.html


Radiologist
Since the invention of the x-ray more than one hundred years ago, the ability to see inside the human body has enabled doctors to understand how our bodies work -- and how they don't.

Read more:

http://www.collegeboard.com/csearch/majors_careers/profiles/careers/104984.html
http://www.mikety.net/POV/rad-info.html


HealthCareers.org

This award-winning, totally free Website is for anyone who is planning (or even just imagining) a health career. The health field includes a wide range of professions that can take you in more directions than you may realize. Knowledge is power. When you know what your options are, you can make better choices. Check out this Website for pertinent, reliable information that can help you find and pursue your own health career.

Read more:

http://www.explorehealthcareers.org/


How to Know if A Career in the Health Professions is Right For You
These articles provide "food for thought" if you are considering a health-related career.

Read more:
http://www.minoritymedicalstudents.com/html/Keepsake/decisions.htm
http://www.minoritymedicalstudents.com/html/Keepsake/medicine.htm


Careers in Medicine
Are you considering a career in medicine?

Read more:
http://www.aamc.org/students/cim/
http://www.aamc.org/students/minorities/start.htm
http://fastweb.monster.com/fastweb/content/focus/story/3188.ptml?ID=
http://jgh.hunter.cuny.edu/webarticledtl.asp


Allied Health Professions
This site provides information about allied health professional careers.

Read more:
http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/10481.html
http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/category/2302.html


Careers in Allied Health Care
The health care industry is huge. It encompasses a variety of occupations ranging from medical doctors to dental hygenists. Educational requirements for this wide range of career choices, of course, vary as do credentials and salary levels. Rather than cover the gamut of occupational choices in this tremendous field, this article will cover allied health professions only.

Read more:
http://careerplanning.about.com/library/weekly/aa011299.htm


Allied Health Professions
Did you know. . . that you could have a healthcare career without being a nurse or a doctor? In fact, most people in healthcare belong to another group of professionals called allied health providers. These professionals work to deliver high-quality patient care services for the identification, prevention and treatment of diseases, disabilities and disorders. That's a long way of saying that allied health providers work to make sick or injured people healthy and keep them healthy.

Read more:
http://www.healthpronet.org/exploring_ahp/


Mathematics

The following list will provide you with ideas about careers if you are interested in Mathematics:

--Actuarial Science   

--Applied Mathematics   

--Mathematical Statistics and Probability   

--Statistics

--Teacher/Professor


These sites will provide you with additional information about some of the aforementioned areas:

Careers In Mathematics
Have you ever wondered what a mathematician working in industry or the government does all day? You can look in the archives at an alphabetical listing of over 90 career profiles of mathematicians working in nonacademic positions. Or, you can search the archives by key word, employment sector or degree and access the profiles, forums and applications of the mathematicians previously profiled in the Mathematical Careers Bulletin Board.

Read more:
www.ams.org/careers/


Careers In Mathematics
Have you ever wondered what careers are linked to mathematics? Look at these Web sites:

Read more:
http://www.ams.org/careers/

http://www.math.purdue.edu/jobs/careerInfo/


Physical Sciences

The following list will provide you with ideas about careers if you are interested in the Physical Sciences:

--Analytical Chemistry

--Astronomy   

--Astrophysics   

--Atmospheric Sciences and Meteorology, General   

--Chemistry, General   

--Geological and Earth Sciences/Geosciences   

--Geochemistry   

--Geology/Earth Science, General   

--Geophysics and Seismology   

--Inorganic Chemistry   

--Metallurgy   

--Atomic/Molecular Physics   

--Nuclear Physics   

--Oceanography, Chemical and Physical   

--Organic Chemistry   

--Paleontology   

--Planetary Astronomy and Science   

--Pharmaceutical Chemistry   

--Physical Chemistry   

--Physics, General  

--Teacher/Professor 


Careers in Inorganic Chemistry

Inorganic chemistry is the study of the synthesis and behavior of inorganic and organometallic compounds. It has applications in every aspect of the chemical industry?including catalysis, materials science, pigments, surfactants, coatings, medicine, fuel, and agriculture.

Read more:
http://www.chemistry.org/portal/a/c/s/1/acsdisplay.html?DOC=vc2%5C3wk%5Cwk3_inorg.html

Physics Careers
Whether starting out in a first job or changing direction mid-career, a physics degree is a passport to a wide range of professions. These include traditional fields of employment such as research, education and industry, and new areas such as computing, finance and healthcare.

Read more:

http://physicsweb.org/bestof/careers

Exploring Physics
Whether starting out in a first job or changing direction mid-career, a physics degree is a passport to a wide range of professions. These include traditional fields of employment such as research, education and industry, and new areas such as computing, finance and healthcare.

Read more:

http://physicsweb.org/bestof/careers


Science Career Webs
Welcome to the Science Careers Web site! Here you will find numerous valuable resources in preparing to major in the geosciences, biological sciences, marine sciences, and beyond.

Read more:
http://www.sciencecareersweb.net/


What are the Physical Sciences?
The knowledge of Physical Science is important for the development of the products we use. It is also an interesting and exciting subject of value in many walks of life. There is a great need for people who understand scientific principles and know how to think logically. Your knowledge and skills in these areas can help you excel in school, advance your career or improve your business.

Read more:
http://www.school-for-champions.com/science.htm


Physical Sciences Career Exploration Links
This page contains links that can help you explore your career interests.

Read more:
http://www.careercc.com/phy.shtml


Physical Science Hotlist
This page lists lots of links to physical science information.

Read more:
http://www.fi.edu/tfi/hotlists/physical.html


Careers in the Geosciences
Do you find the prospect of working on a wide range of Earth-related issues, from resource management to environmental protection exciting? Do you enjoy working outdoors? Travel? Do you enjoy puzzle solving and working across scales, using details to solve wider problems? Then the geosciences may be an interesting career path to investigate. We invite you to explore this site, and all of the AGI Geoscience Careers materials.

Read more:
http://www.earthscienceworld.org/careers


Careers in Physics
This site provides many links to other physics-related sites.

Read more:
http://www.uncwil.edu/stuaff/career/Majors/physics.htm


Profiles of Engineers, Physicists and More!
Prior to college, there are several steps you can take to help prepare for careers in engineering, mathematics, or the physical sciences.  Many of these ideas can help you focus on a career path by giving you exposure to the types of activities with different career areas.

Read more:
http://www.careercornerstone.org/profiles.htm


The Sloan Career Cornerstone Center
The Sloan Career Cornerstone Center offers vast resources on the following fields. Within each area you'll find a profile of the field, and links to video and print profiles of professionals working in each area. There are downloadable lists of employers and degree granting universities, and links to professional associations.

Aerospace Engineering, Bioengineering, Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Engineering Technology, Geosciences, Industrial Engineering, Information Technology, Materials Science and Engineering, Mathematics, Mechanical Engineering , Nuclear Engineering , and Physics

Read more:
http://www.careercornerstone.org/disciplines.htm

 

 

 
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